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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
president obama has seen these polls. so if there is a fiscal cliff and we go over it, the american public are likely to blame the republicans. >> well, that's absolutely true, piers. we've had an election and the clearest debate and the clearest difference in that election was over the question of whether the rich should pay more and tax rates should go up on the rich. everybody who paid any attention at all knows that the top 2% are now taking home a larger share of total income and wealth in this country than they have in over 80 years and are paying the lowest effective tax rate they paid in over a half a century. we also have a looming budget deficit. so you don't have to really be a rocket scientist to understand that the rich do have to pay more. taxes do have to be raised on the rich and i think that's why over 60% of the public in these polls are not only supportive of a tax increase on the rich, but also will blame the republicans if we go over the fiscal cliff. and this gives frankly, this gives the white house and this gives the obama administration much more bargaining leverag
for the wealthy and quote, sticks the middle class with the bill. so with 29 days to go until the fiscal cliff, what would it take to get a deal? joining me now, men on opposite sides, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform and robert reish, former secretary of labor for president bill clinton and the author of "beyond outrage." none of the three of us are beyond outrage, grover norquist, which is why i keep having you back. the situation it seems to me as an impartial observer here is that both sides have now made fairly ludicrous offers that they know the other side is never going to accept in a million years. that does beg the question, grover, why bother, given that both sides know where they need to move, why the games? >> well, it's not clear that both sides know. the week after the election, president obama was asked do you have to have the higher rates or could we have deductions and credits and he said he was open to negotiations. three weeks later, after thanksgiving, he shows up and all of a sudden there's a line in the sand on rates that had come out of nowhere, so
to be here christmas week in order to protect the american public from the fiscal cliff, i'm happy to be here, and so are my colleagues. >> i hope everybody speaks greek because that would be the appropriate language to use the week after christmas. thank you. get it done before christmas. thank you, u.s. congressman lee terry, thank you so much for coming. >>> up next, president obama had mitt romney over for lunch at the white house. do you believe it? i'd love to know what happened in that room. it's the latest edition in the often frosty relationship between the presidential rivals. it was pretty warm for about an hour on election night. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> well, this next story should surprise no one. the 112th congress is on track to be the least productive since the 1940s. with just weeks left, the congress has passed 196 bills into law, many of them ceremonial pieces of legislation like the naming of courthouses. since the 1940s the least productive congress was the 110th in the mid-'90s which passed 333 laws into law. the current congress would have to pas
have to be here christmas week in order to protect the american public from the fiscal cliff, i'm happy to be here, and so are my colleagues. >> i hope everybody speaks greek because that would be the appropriate language to use the week after christmas. thank you. get it done before christmas. thank you, u.s. congressman lee terry, thank you so much for coming. thank you, congressman connolly. >>> up next, president obama had mitt romney over for lunch at the white house. do you believe it? i'd love to know what happened in that room. it's the latest edition in the often frosty relationship between the presidential rivals. it was pretty warm for about an hour on election night. this is "hardball," the place for politics. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. monarch of marketing analysis. with the ability to improve roi through seo all by cob. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. i'm going b-i-g. [ male announcer ] good choice business pro. good
americans sent us to do. >> you mentioned the fiscal cliff and i want to ask you about it. president obama even in his p - proposal yesterday had entitlement cuts including to medicare. you have in the past been resistant to cutting entit entitlements. does the result of the election -- i've heard many people on the democratic side say, look, we won. we don't need to make concess n concessions to republicans on entitlements. we can raise the top rates without making these concessions. do you think the president is even in this first proposal giving away too much on the entitlement side? >> i think it's important to note that there's a difference between working to cut medicare and protecting the benefits. and itch said repeatedly that i will not vote to cut the benefits people have earned and depend on because they put those benefits into place, one, this in the middle of a depression, social security, and the other one, medicare, because they were needed. republicans and democrats recognized they needed these programs because people got old and people got sick and they still do. so i wi
't think the american people will get anything unless we let things go over the fiscal cliff. republicans will never agree to anything. i think obama needs to stick to his guns. guest: that is one of view of some liberals and some republicans say let's go over the cliff. then you get to cut tax rates. that is easier politically to do. nobody says it is their first choice. some say the democrats could have more leverage if we go over the cliff. some think tanks have said and most people understand it is a slope. it will be gradual. many people are looking to the stock-market to see what their reaction is if there is not a deal. that could have its own impact on the economy. host: author any strong advocates in the administration who maintain the payroll tax cuts? guest: chris van hollen is a top democrat in the house and has been vocal about saying we should continue it. larry summers said we should continue it. the obama administration had said that it was time to go back and let the tax cut expire. they have been quiet about that recently. host: now again, from "money" magazine. if you m
's not a good idea to go over the fiscal cliff. no one wants to see that happen. it is a bad idea. but a worse idea is to accept a compromise that allows the wealthy americans to continue to not pay their fair share because the result of that will be middle class families will bear the entire burden of the challenges that this country faces. that's not fair or responsible. >> how do we do it? how does this country manage to get a decently fair deal in time to beat this cliff, avoid it? >> tom cole said it all. take what the president has offered right now. make sure that 98% of the people aren't affected by any tax increases. that's how we get it started. and patty is absolutely right. we have all these problems facing us and this is the way to do it. a bad deal would be saying to the millionaires and billionaires, you're going to get a big tax break. that's what the elections was about. we held an election. it isn't as if this was a sidebar issue, chris. this was a main issue. >> i know. >> so, we can fix this. we can stop the sequester right now. we can make sure that 98% of the people don't
analysis, a, most americans don't understand what the fiscal cliff is or the impact that it could bring or do you think it's because they believe that ultimately we will get a deal by december 31st? >> well, as you say, it's a bit of a mystery why confidence is so high. it may have something to do with the housing market and house prices being up around most of the country. that probably does help confidence some. i expect as you point out that most people probably don't have on their radar how large a tax hit we could have early next year if the fiscal cliff actually materializes. so it is a mystery. it does seem like right now consumers aren't too worried about the fiscal cliff. >> at what point do you get concerned? it sounds like perhaps a risk of revisions to q-4 estimates to the downside at this point because as the negotiations grind on and we approach year end, it might reach more of the forefront of consumers' mind and they may pull back. are you concerned about that impact? >> i am. right now we only have october data in hand. and fiscal cliff fears really accelerated in novem
released his counterproposal on the fiscal cliff that grover norquist is still very much in charge of the republican party. republicans said once again that they were absolutely unwilling to raise tax rates on the wealthiest of americans. even though they were adopted in 2001 as a temporary measure only because we had a surplus. they were temporary because ten years later, we might have a surplus. we might need the money. that's exactly the situation is today. but sadly, it is not grover norquist or mitt romney or mitch mcconnell that's running the republican party. it is still a big lobbyist by the name of grover norquist. have a good one folks!
up on the wealthiest americans. and i don't really see them doing that. >> if the republicans say sorry, no way are we going to raise rates on the wealthy, you guys are willing to go off the fiscal cliff? >> if republicans are not willing to let rates go back up, and we think they should go back to the clinton levels, a time when the american economy is doing exceptionally well, then there will not be an agreement. >> but house speaker john bigger is digging in himself, admitting talks are going nowhere. speaker boehner also described the moment when secretary geithner first showed him the president's opening offer. >> i was just flabbergasted. i looked at him and said, "you can't be serious." i've just never seen anything like it. you know, we've got seven weeks between election day and the end of the year. and three of those weeks have been wasted with this nonsense. right now i would say we're nowhere, period. we're nowhere. we've put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually
of going over the fiscal cliff -- republicans are going to have to abrogate that pledge. it is not conservatism bound to 35% tax rate. that is not one of the and mutable principles of american conservatism. we want taxes to be as low as they can possibly be while running a government that is not bankrupt and in structural deficit for as far as the eye can see. you will have to see republican leaders step up here and meet the president's somewhere in the middle on this to get the country's fiscal path on a path to solvency so we can start to have economic growth again in the country. >> do you want to comment a little bit about what you expect from the next six weeks? not even six weeks? however many weeks it is now between -- between now and the start of this booklet. working in the white house limits what you can say, but how you see his plan at between now and january? >> steve is exactly right, all the you are seeing a very concerted members of the house dig in on a no revenues. it is good to see many republicans saying yes. i cannot get into a lot of details -- i thi
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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